Inland Jamaican Island Adventures and Excursions

Dunner River Falls Jamaica

I flew into Montego Bay (a fairly cheap flight from the east coast of the US), and while I had some commitments for work, I arrived early so I could see one of the most amazing islands in the world.  World Famous Jamaica!!! Known for Bob Marley, Music, the Reggae movement (read more in my other Jamaica post on  Reggae Jamaica), the amazing people and rich culture of friendly people.  What an incredible island with so much to see.  If Jamaica is a quick stop, you have to focus on what you can fit in.  I understand that.  I was luck to spend time in both sides of the island and see the best of Montego Bay, Ocho Rios, and Kingston.  I hope this post gives you some great ideas of what to see and what to do!

Jamaica from the air

First off let me tell you all of the bad things I heard that were so  wrong!

– I heard they had horrible roads

– I heard I had to expect horrible drivers

– I heard it would take me forever to get from place to place

– I heard it would be dangerous for me and I should be really careful cause people would try to cheat me.

So wrong… Don’t believe everything you hear!

There were a few things that I learned for travel tips that I’ll cover at the end of this post.  A few words of caution, but for the most part, I was so glad to embrace Jamaica and not be afraid.  The people were amazing!

Driving

First stop was to pick up the car.  Yes, despite everything I was told, I figured I would want a car. I’m that kind of traveller that driving on the other side of the road and even with crazy roads and drivers, I still feel great, so I took on the challenge of Jamaican driving.  Reality is, the roads were great!  I’ve driven in Barbados and Puerto Rico and these roads were better than what I saw on both of those islands.  I kept saying, where are those bad roads?  Where are those crazy drivers?  I guess I fit right in.  I admit I did get pulled over by the police twice.  Now there is some advice and story to that.  I drove across the island.  In all I drove both ways across the island and logged at least 12 hours on the road and I admit I was looking for the best and worst of the island.  I drove to Nine mile, and I drove into trench town and some of the shady area of Kingston and suburbs.  More on driving at the end of the post

 

Rose Hall Great House

 

Rose Hall Jamaica

If you love history, you’ll love Rose Hall.  If you love romance, architecture, tours… you’ll love Rose Hall.  There is so much of the story of the island and it’s history that is locked up in the history of Rose Hall.  As the first real attraction just 15 min outside of Montego Bay, I was happy to have made Rose Hall my main investment of time the first night I arrived.  Rose Hall is one place during the day, and another during the night.  In the night you can tour the great house by candle light.  Constructed in 1770 the owners  had over 2000 slaves and was one of the many great houses that existed.  It is one of the few on the island that remain.  During slave revolt most of the great homes on the island were destroyed.  The history here is one of VooDoo and murder and the story of Annie the white witch as seen on World’s Scariest Places, and Ghost Hunters International.  It was $20 USD to visit the hall.  I found most of the attractions to land at about $20.

Rose Hall Haunted Bedroom of Annie

The bedroom of Annie Palmer.  Who murdered all of her husbands and lovers.

Tomb of Annie Palmer

The Tomb of Annie Palmer…  Listening to a story from our adorable guide in period dress.

You can read more about the tours at Rose Hall on their website RoseHall.com.

 

As far as spending money, we really didn’t even need to exchange our money.  Every place we went took both Jamaican dollars and US Dollars.  In fact, we were getting a better rate by using US Dollars as the money I exchanged at the airport was a worse rate than I was getting on the street.  Paying with US dollars worked great.

That first night we drove to Ocho Rios…  A stop at the night market

Market in Ocho Rios  (Great during the Day or Night!)

Jerk Chicken

Jamaican Jerk Chicken cooked right on the street.  Some are spicier than others.  None of them were as spicy as I was expecting, but you could add your own Scotch peppers to kick it up!

Night Market Jamaica Ocho Rios

The fruit of the night market.  For the most part the night market was one for the locals.  We really didn’t see any tourists as we visited the stalls and walked around Ocho Rios.  I think many were surprised to see us as so many of the travelers simply stay on their resorts, especially at night.  We had plenty of folks who wanted to show us around.  While I was fine doing my own tour, we stayed out pretty late… 1am and didn’t mind spending some time really getting to know some of the locals and hearing their stories.

Dunn’s River Falls

Dunns River Falls Jamaica

One of the most beautiful on the island, but one of many amazing waterfalls on the island.  Dunn’s River falls is famous across the island.  You can either bring your own water shoes or rent some for fairly cheap.  I learned on another trip that climbing with socks gives you pretty good grip.  So I hiked the falls in my socks and it worked just fine.  I really enjoyed the hike up the falls.  It was only as extreme as you made it.  It costs $20 for  adult foreigners enter the falls park. There were easy paths to climb.  I would have been fine with my boys climbing it and may just have to bring them back soon.

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The falls lands right into the beach.  Beautiful beach.  Since we weren’t on an organized tour we arrived early and had the entire beach to ourselves.  Amazing turquois waters including a life guard and a roped off area to help you know the area that’s safe and protected.  Of course, I tested the boundaries and even stood up on an old pier and jumped out into the beautiful waters.

Jamaican Beach Sandy

Beautiful sandy beaches.  So much warmer water than I’m use to on the West Coast of the US.

Jamaica Fall

You can see the hand holds here on the left.  I climbed the falls trying to take a medium difficulty route that I made up on my own.  You could hire a guide to follow.  I found that to be unnecessary.  It wasn’t challenging, it was fun.  I did try to put myself into some challenging positions.

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Having arrived early, I had the falls to myself.  One of my friends took pictures from a viewing area on the side.  Lot of great pools, and amazing waters.  This is a wonder of the island and one that should be appreciated.  I understand there are different falls in the interior of the island and this one while it does have a local price for the islanders, they end up going to different falls.

Mystic Mountain Rain Forest Adventures

Mystic Mountain Rain Forest

While we were on our way back to Ocho Rios, we saw the signs for Mystic Mountain.  I’m a fan of ziplines and canopy tours, and still had fresh memories of my time in Costa Rica.  It was a beautiful day and I felt like we had a little time to go.  So we decided to do the Sky Explorer which would take us through the rain forest on a chair lift (like a ski lift).  We also took the bobsled ride.  We were limited on time or we likely would have done the full package.  Honestly it was a bit pricey, but I’m sure it took a lot to put this together and while it was my intention to avoid the touristy areas, I felt like this allowed me to see and enjoy a lot in a short period of time.  The Bobsled theme was pretty cool as well.  We did find a moment to relax and enjoy the beautiful humming birds.  Fantastic colors.  If you end up doing this, I highly recommend slowing it down and enjoying nature and soaking up the rainforest and all it has to offer.  The adrenaline rush of the bobsled ride and zipline is awesome, but be sure to slow down and relax.  That’s really an important thing to realize that Jamaica is about.  Enjoying life and appreciating what you have.

  • Sky Explorer – chair lift
  • Rainforest Bobsled – bob sled ride through the rain forest (additional cost)
  • Canopy Zipline – multiple ziplines through the rain forest (additional cost)
  • Butterflies and Hummingbirds – little areas setup with humming bird food (included once you’re up there)
  • Waterslide and Infinity pool (included with your purchase)

More info from Mystic Mountain (be sure to read the reviews on Trip Advisor as well)

 

Mystic Mountain Rain Forest

Beautiful views from the chairlift of the amazing waters, beaches, and Ocho Rios off in the distance.  Floating slowly over the tops of the trees on the chair lift.

Food – Eat Jamaican!

Jamaica Cliffs

Up the road from Ocho Rios is a truly mystical place.  Talking of taking a moment and enjoying nature… As the water would come in and go back it would swell and shoot up like a blow hole spraying a fine mist.  We stopped here for lunch at Oracabessa.  Momma took care of us.  Incredible seafood, fish, and more.  I included a few photos.

Get All Right Jamaica

This is what you see from the road.  A fun Jamaican reggae guy was working on the roof of the place, but we went further over next to the cliffs.

Conch Salad

Conch salad

Curry Lobster

Curry Lobster!

Dishes you have to have while on the island after you eat the Jerk Pork and Jerk Chicken is… Curry Lobster, and bonus points for Ox Tail, and Curry Goat.

My Favorite Jerk Chicken on the Island is Scotchies… I ended up eating there in Montego Bay (the original) and in Kingston (in the bar area).  There’s another near Ocho Rios, maybe others!?

Scotchies

Jamaican Cooking

Thursday is ribs!  But you can get the chicken and pork every day.  Go for the pork! It’s the best, but the Jerk Chicken is famous.  You can tell it’s real by the corrugated tin.

 

Native Fish plate

We also ate at M10 in Kingston, a local place with great music and great food, and especially great seafood!  Great ginger beer as well.

 

Bonus: More Nightlife and Carnival

Now for something that most travelers and tourists would miss.  Though a friend we tracked down a party that was going on in one of the neighborhoods in Kingston.  It seemed like it was going to go on all night, we ended up leaving at 4AM and the DJs were just changing to start a new set.

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One other night we happened to be in Kingston for Mas Camp.  It’s basically practice leading up to Carnival.

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Jamaican Dancer

Carnival dancer at Mas Camp with a couple of my friends.  High energy dancing… Kingston is where the best music and entertainment is on the island.  I didn’t see any tourists at this event.

Mas Camp

While I did end up staying on the island for 4 days, the first 24 hours of just soaking up the island was so incredible.  I had an amazing time.  I did mention that I drove across the island and spent more time than is spent in this post.  Refer to my post on Bob Marley’s Jamaica and Reggae tour to see what else I saw with my time on the island.  I do want to give you some balance to what else you’ll find on the island.

Some Warning and Caution

We did find a few hustlers and people begging, but for the most part when we asked them to leave they did.  It wasn’t as aggressive as other islands or even close to what I’ve seen in much of Africa.  This was less than what you’d see in big cities in the US.  Don’t be so afraid to venture out of your all inclusive resort.  Don’t believe the stories.  Experience it for yourself.

There is still some corruption.  I was pulled over by the police twice.  The first time, I got a warning to slow down.  There are basically two speeds on the ring road.  50 KM and 80 KM.  The police were usually hanging out where it would transition to the slow speed and they’d be on the side of the road with their speed guns waving people over.  By the time you see them or recognize, you’re likely going too fast.  The second time I got pulled over, I got a different answer.  The policeman asked me if I wanted to find a way to settle this.  He asked me to be subtle, but to take the papers back to the car and put some money in it.  Didn’t tell me how much.  I think we ultimately put in about $10 and he didn’t even look, he just put it in his pocket and told me to slow down.  I also got booted once.  The guy was wearing a blue shirt.  Everybody knew it was the guy in the blue shirt who was the one that booted the cars that weren’t suppose to leave their cars there.  We were stopping to get our tickets before taking the car back and it looked like others had left their cars parked for a few minutes, but ours was the one that got the boot.  $20 later, I was on my way.  No other real problems.  I grew up in Idaho and so I’m use to passing cars on two lane roads.  What was different was the need to slow down a bit when people didn’t allow enough time when passing.  It was much better driving than I experienced in Italy or especially than Naples, so I really can’t complain about the driving practices.  Seemed pretty normal to me.  There are some pretty narrow roads which go across the island, where you really need to be on watch.  In Kingston itself there are the early numbered streets like first street and fifth street and streets around Trench town that certain streets aren’t designed to be through streets that don’t have the road blocks on the GPS or on the maps.  For the most part you don’t need to be in there.  Make sure the GPS is sending you to the actual street you’re looking for, some times it would fail to find it, but default to somewhere else and that’s where we’d be driving in strange roads, but for the most part, I enjoyed the challenge and the people were great.  I would not compare Jamaica to most of the African villages.  It’s one of the best islands in the Caribbean (easily one of my favorite) and the industry is really up and coming.  The businesses and people really deserve your support.  I see Jamaica as a great place to do outsourcing and a great place to work with hard working happy people.

Fresh Coconut

Fresh coconut for $2 USD… Yes, Jamaica is paradise.  While this photo catches me right after I survived climbing the Dunn’s River waterfall and isn’t flattering it shows off a bit of the natural beauty of the island.  What an amazing place.  Can’t wait to get back so I can go to the other parts of the island…. Negril and Blue Mountains and so much more to see!

Don’t miss my post on my Reggae Jamaica

Social Mush: End World Hunger


There are 7 really solid Ideas that are making a difference in the world in combating world hunger which really stems from world poverty.  Many of these ideas are very entrepreneurial.  I really like Microloans and I’m sold on them.  I’ve been using Kiva, and my mom has been giving us Heifer International gifts for Christmas the last couple of years, which as well really seem to hit the problem at it’s roots by helping people gain access to loans and support in the case of Kiva, and animals for production in the case of Heifer.  The gifts that keep on giving… like a laying hen, or a pair of rabbits or nanny goat which could produce milk, cheese, and so much more.

In the end it appears to me that logistics alone keep these programs for going further.  On Kiva.org it’s local lenders and support groups.  They do work.  I’ve seen near 100% return on the Microloans I’ve participated in.  I’ve personally seen loans paid back in over 25 countries.  Impressive, this wouldn’t be possible without the speed of technology.

McDonalds has found a way to bring cheap food around the world, but it isn’t solving world hunger.  Imagine a social business that can bring food that’s sourced locally as a franchise and is cheap enough that someone who makes a dollar or two a day can afford it.  The logistics should be easy enough it could be ran out of doors without electricity or in a home, hut, or center camp or village.

Let me introduce you to Social Mush the next Social Business.  It starts with a big bowl, in some cases the bowl is so large that it could fit 5 to 10 people.  It’s also big enough that what it produces could feed 1000 people or 500 or 100 based on the village needs.  At this level the economies of scale to feed the a village could cost $10-20 or around 15 cents a day.

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Fundamental Principles:

  1. The mush is made from local ingredients that are very accessible.  Mush recipes can be customized to ensure proper nutrition.
  2. The cost of the bowl itself and the first month of ingredients in the beginning are supported by international donors in a microloan fashion similar to the Kiva.org model
  3. Each location has a local investor known as the Chef.  This is the social entrepreneur.  They are the one that has identified the need and is trying to meet the local need.  They are responsible to build local partnerships and limited remote connections to provide necessary supplies.
  4. Bowl locations are selected based on the need and basic training qualifications of the chef.
  5. No one is turned away at Breakfast. They will pay what they can.    Customer will come with their own bowl and spoon and be given mush at breakfast.  Credits will be given based on skills earned, training attended or other productive and based on understanding the local needs.  Lunch and Dinner are provided at a standard fixed rate but highly affordable cost which is based on a rate of return which will pay for the bowl and costs to cover the service within a ~6 month period. Shouldn’t be more than $1 and realistically should be around 10-25 cents based on the maturity of the local cost of living.
  6. Customers can work with the Chef to supply and grow ingredients and become suppliers of spices, rice, milk, etc… creating a more local supply of basic ingredients increase quality and reduce cost while even more close to home promoting gardening/farming principles and self reliance.
  7. Training and skills promotion is a key principle:  The Chef will need partners and  assistants and ultimately other franchise people.  Activities that are required to get things going are organizing the supplies, gather wood, start the fire, and notify the locals (Is it a big bell?) Do people come over time based on volume?  This assistance can be repaid in credits through food.  They will also need help stirring, serving, and keeping order. In all cases I think these are volunteer opportunities that result in payment in food.
  8. Franchise.  Much of the organic spread to meet needs relies on successful deployments happening, they can train others in nearby villages and spread the success.
  9. Recipes themselves can be modified based on what is in season and based on what is available.  At some level it comes down to pooling resources.  If I bring some of what I have grown and others do the same, we can all benefit from a greater palate and cornucopia of harvest.  These recipes themselves can be shared.
  10. The organization needs to be run in such as way that social franchises can operate on their own after some period of time.

Would you fund it? What am I missing?

Rock the Kasbah, Marrakesh Morocco


Let’s go back in time… to a more simple time, with rich flavor, and a close knit community.  Imagine the farmers near your home growing your food, you go to the market and find things that are both grown locally, but with no chemicals, and any meat you eat you can first look it in the eyes.  Go back in time with me to Morocco, I’m you’re guide Joel of Arabia.

I also wrote up about travel in Fez another look at time travel back 2000 years.

Ait Ben Haddou - Donkey Ride

We rode donkeys across the river and helped a Berber trader write a post card to his friend.  He’d been traveling across the Sahara for the last few weeks.

 

One of the most fascinating things about Morocco is the fact that at times you definitely feel like you’re in another world completely.  There are time warps you jump through as you see different parts of Morocco.

One place you must visit is the Atlas mountains.  The people of the mountains live like they do in Tibet.  They live off the land.  They eat their animals.  Life off the land despite the harsh conditions.  They walk up crazy steep slopes along goat and sheep trails.  This is the kind of place where if you visit a family, they may take a goat out and slaughter it for the meal in honor of your visit.  The culture is rich, the people are fascinating, and their lives reflect our heritage and history of 1000s of years ago.  What you expect to find in Jerusalem of the old way of doing things is in Morocco.  Part of that reason is literally hundreds of Christian films use this area for their life of Christ movies including, Jesus of Nazareth (1977) and The Last Temptation of Christ (1988).

Kasbah

 

An incredible day trip you MUST do is to visit the UNESCO world heritage site of kasbah-town of Aït Benhaddou. The city looks like it’s 2000 years old, and many of these buildings feel that old, and are built like they were.  It was used as a backdrop for more than 20 films including Films such as The Mummy (1999), Gladiator (2000), Kingdom of Heaven (2005), and the recent Salmon Fishing in the Yemen (2011).

One of the most important fortress strongholds on the old Salt Road where camel caravan traders brought slaves, gold, ivory and salt from Saharan Africa to Marrakech and beyond.  You gotta get out of the city and you can really see amazing things on the trip over the mountain to Ouarzazate.  Pronounced War-za-zot. These include trips to Zagora, an oasis town surrounded by palm tree plantations and a departure point for camel trains to Timbuktu, a journey that would take about 52 days. (Not yet recommended)  Careful on multi country treks as the Algerian border is some times closed.  Most would consider the 1 day, 3 day and 7 day caravan trips.

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The Berber people are from the desert.  They are nomads.  They trade and barter.  Every Berber has things he wants to show you, and you are his guest.  He’ll invite you in for some amazing and sweet mint tea.  As his guest he will roll out his dozens of carpets, and show you his finest jewelry.  It’s customary for him to show you everything, and you pick out various things you like, and then the bartering begins.  It’s natural for it to start out high, and then as you negotiate, you can take things out and barter for the things you really really want.  It seems like with me, I always win and they always tell me I’m a shrewd trader.  After that, they make me feel at home and we exchange gifts.  It’s good to bring something small from home that you can give to his wife, like makeup or perfume, or something for his kids.  It’s a bit embarrassing when he gives you a gift and wonders if you have something for his wife.   Be more prepared than I was.  One strategy I’ve learned from berbers and taxi drivers around the world is they like to be right, but they want to make sure you’re happy.  Learn that you don’t have to have the last say, and you’ll make your host a lot happier and you’ll get much better service even if you are a very shrewd trader.  In Morocco it’s not unusual to get 70-80% off.  I got some incredible massive fossils for about $20 and less.  The prices often start in the 100-200 range.  Something in the states that would cost me closer to $100.  One thing you do learn is you don’t ask the price unless you really want the item.  That often means, don’t ask unless you want to spent the next 10 minutes bartering.  It’s not customary to just make one offer and walk away.  They like the sit down and relax… you are my guest kind of bartering, not I’ll make you an offer and then walk away.

 

You feel like you must be Lawrence of Arabia, or the Prince of Persia a couple more of the many films that was filmed here. Be sure to wanted around Ouarzazate an important trading city on the edge of the Sahara desert. Get lost in the old Kasbah.

222596_4954813782_1933_nI encourage you to get a variety.  Across everywhere you’ll visit there are few shops with set prices, and even more rare in the villages.  For food you don’t have to do  bartering.  If you’ve ever had Moroccan food in your life you’ve likely either eaten dates and finger food on large platters sitting on big cushions and relaxing to music.  When the main dish comes out it’s smothered in amazing stewed carrots, zucchini, or egg plant including lamb, beef or chicken with the tender meat cooked in large clay pots over coos coos.  This earthen method makes it all very tender.  Incredible food.  As we ate we watched to storks making a lot of noise in a massive nest.  The city is made of the soil as well baked mud bricks… the pottery is everywhere.  Pride in every bite.

You can eat at a fine restaurant and spend $50 for amazing Moroccan food or spend $2 and pick the meat in skewers and sit under a tent near the square.  As well, stop at a café for a an amazing meal.  The salads are fantastic with fresh cucumbers, tomatoes, black and green olives and of course Oranges!  An incredible Mediterranean meal.  I hear you can even get camel meat.  Andrew Zimmern style meals are within reach, but even without stretching your pallete, you can have some of the freshest, best food you’ve ever tasted.  I seriously think we have a LOT to learn from the simple ways.  Our food has been messed up, and Marrakech and surrounding area and likely much of Morroco has got it right.  Western Europe and the US is missing out.  There are now restaurants who try to mimic this, that try to get back to eating local, but they may be missing elements.  The owners would do well to spend some time in Morocco to learn what it is that makes the difference.  There is something to be said of organic, locally grown, no chemicals, and that connection with the earth that’s in the oven, in the pots, and the open flame.  Turkey, Bulgaria, Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, Israel… there are others that have this figured out as well.

 

Djemma El Fna – Currently my favorite market in the world! I LOVE the town square of Marrakech. Before there was TV, Radios, Phones, and iPads.  A thousand years ago, on the edge of civilization there was a mystical place.  A place with story tellers, snake charmers, acrobats, fresh fruit juices made by hand with fruit from the trees in the town you were in.  This place still exists!  Every day after my trips around the city, I would end my day in this place.  It was packed with locals.  The best nuts and juice in the world is available for the taking.  One amazing thing about Marrakech is the fresh smell of Orange.  The trees that line the streets are Orange trees.  I don’t know a city anywhere else where Orange trees are scattered throughout the city.  It’s like Johnny Appleseed had a counterpart in Marrakech and all he did his whole life was plant Orange trees in this one city.  While I’m sure it could make a mess in some cities here they gather them up and there is fresh orange juice anywhere you want.  We paid 35 cents (.35 USD) for our glass of orange Juice.  It continues to be the best glass of orange juice I’ve had in my life!

 

The square is filled with locals listening to these stories and watching what’s going on.  I wish I could be invisible and watch the goings on of that square.  Instead, I walk up to see the crazy acrobat, similar to those “artists” who do tricks or play music in most large cities around the world and collect money, but I barely get a chance to see what the tricks are, and they are up in my face asking me for some money.  Despite the fact that I’m happy to contribute a coin.  I just visited an ATM and I have no change.  No money no show, but wait I haven’t seen anything yet.  Tip: bring small change, and expect for them to seem a little insulted, but really that’s just the whole bartering pattern.  I’m sure if you gave them a dollar or more they’d be much happier, but maybe it doesn’t matter.  The first answer is always to ask for more in that culture.  Either way, I come back later with change, and I am fascinated by the diversity of what comes.

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It’s cool to see the cobras being charmed and then a harmless water snake strung around my neck without asking for it… Yes, I’ve seen a snake before, but I’m happy just watching you charm the Cobras.  Really it is an amazing place, but there are surprises.  You’ll see things here you won’t see anywhere else.  Just like mimes that want money from you if you take there picture, there’s these very colorful characters I call the Water guys, who want the equivalent of a dollar/euro/pound for a picture.  If you sneak a picture be really careful they don’t notice.  I didn’t pay.

One guy on the square is “the dentist.”  He has his crude tools to pull out your tooth.  Of course you go back a hundred years and a guy like this could come in handy.  He’ll really take care of that aching tooth.  He has a few hundred teeth to prove he really will do it.  If you look at his collection of teeth pulling equipment and hear his story, you should contribute to the cause.

Clips from our family trip…

Not far from the square is the souks and the medina.  The Old city.  I love telling people that if you went back in time, it would be no different than walking through these old streets.  The souks are walking only winding alleyways of a sort where you can go to amazing shops, and markets and see how the people lived 1000 years ago.  There are a lot of locals who are happy to be you’re guide for a small fee.  If someone wants to show you around, you can tell them, I don’t need a guide… but expect to be asked 5-10 more times.  I found I would get someone who spoke good enough english and negotiate some time.  It was worth it.  We visited a bakery, where the there is a community adobe oven where people who need a stove do their cooking old school.  There’s the chicken place where you can pick out your live chicken.  Simply tell them which one you want and how much preparation you want.  One word.  FRESH.  Just like the high end stores where you can pick out your fish.  Here you can get a chicken to take home with you…

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As well, we came by the baths and water place.  People come from all over to collect water to bring home.  It reminds me of the lady by the well, in Christ’s time.  People come water their animals, but also collect water for drinking.  The homes really are for sleeping.  The entertainment is in the streets, why do you need a kitchen when you can get it all fresh and local?  The people are simple, but it’s amazing to me the principles of life they live.  They eat better than we do, they eat local, they eat food that has been gathered or grown within less than 20 miles of the city.

As you wander the city don’t be afraid to slow down, and talk with the people.  They want to talk to you.  They are very interested in where you come from and how you are enjoying yourself.  Slow down and enjoy the mint tea.  There’s a fast pace of the city and there’s the slow pace of the desert.  Both of these cultures clash to make Marrakech as rich as the dyes in the colors of the carpets.  If you feel so inclined you can visit the place where they mix the dyes.  Again a place that will take you back thousands of years.

 

Marrakech MosqueLose yourself.  That’s the goal.  Go back in time.  There are so many adventures to be had here.  This is a place with a different pace, but also various modes of transportation.  Getting off the plane at the Marrakech airport, we were rushed off in a taxi that seemed put together with bailing twine.  You don’t just have to take taxis, in contrast to the western world where a carriage brings up memories of being a Prince and Princess.  Here a carriage is a good alternative transport.  There is no difference in price.  They both can be negotiated with.  When you slow your pace, you’ll definitely have to give it a shot.  It’s an oldie, but goodie.

The’s one story of Marrakech, that blows my mind, and my eyes.  The Saadian tombs were build in the 16th century, and lost to the world.  They were rediscovered in 1917 with a fly over.  Can you believe that?  A 15 minute walk from the town square and these tombs were simply walled off.  The colored tiles are beautiful and intricate designs.

Call to prayer echoing over the city, some westerners may be intimidated in this Arabian city.  Personally I think the singing brings an element that helps remind me I’m not at home anymore.  That’s a very good thing.  Jews live side by side with Muslims.  The locals tattoo themselves with their faith.  The door handles and markings on the hundreds of year old doors in the old city.  You can tell a lot about the people.  Marrakech is an old capital city and center of a major trade route a very old trade route that would bring in goods from Africa and goods from across the desert.  If you feel so inclined you can spend a week on a real desert excursion into the Sahara.  Live with the Berbers, live like the Bedouin people.image

Camels are majestic animal.  They meant the difference between death and survival in the desert.  An animal that was built for the conditions.

 

If you see a large group of camels.  The people with them will give you a small ride for a price.  There is actually very little difference in price for an hour ride and getting on for a picture.  They’ll get you loaded up and walking and tell you the price doesn’t matter.  It’s a good price for you.  Travel Tip: Always always negotiate before you get on the camel’s back.  It’s in their interest to have you think price doesn’t matter.  Negotiating Similar to the carriage ride.  They don’t know that you know that they are willing to take a local price.  Sometimes it even helps to say… I don’t want tourist prices, I want local prices.  The price will drop in half or more.  For camels you can end up paying easily $50 USD if they get their first price.  Instead be willing to walk away and you can get a good ride for $5.  They’ve been standing out in the heat, they want something fair, and depending on the time of day and how business has been really impacts their willingness to accept various prices.

Morocco, is one of the richest accessible and inaccessible place in the world.  It’s a world of extremes.  It’s the place of adventure.  Just the name sparks imagination of a country of Muslims poorly portrayed in Babel.  While I loved the scenes of Morocco in Babel, I fear the stereotypes create walls and prevent people from experiencing the richness that is so accessible.  Morocco is a bridge to our brothers in the Middle East.  If the western world is to ever understand the Arabic world, it begins by understanding, and the spice of Morocco is an incredibly colorful place to start.  As France struggles with it’s imperial past, and seeks to understand what it’s future is Christian, Jew, and Muslim have much to learn from the gateway to the Sahara.

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Pictured Above: My boys are getting a personal tour of the mosque from one of the boys of the souks.  They didn’t speak the same language, but they did communicate… volumes.