Georgetown Guyana Picture Guide On the Road Less Traveled

Guyana Black Water Creek and Beach

In my travels across South America, I had the opportunity to visit some rarely visited parts of South America.  The former colonies of the Dutch, France, Portuguese, Spanish and the British.  Guyana was both Dutch and then most recently a British colony but became independent from the UK in 1966 and in 1970 became a republic.  The official language is English, the only country in South America where that’s the case.  While I’ve been to Belize a central american former british colony that speaks English, it wasn’t the best trip.  It is one of my least favorite.  It was a mainland drive and I had a run in with the police.  On my trip across Belize I found more depressing moments than not.  I do plan to give it another chance sometime in the future.  Guyana had a few sad moments, but  I don’t let poverty keep me from visiting a place.  I feel I both gain a greater appreciation for what I have, and I find what really matters in life.  Our families, relationships, faith and shared experiences.  I met the family of a couple of my local friends I met first on facebook through SharePoint the technology that I work with.

This post on Guyana will be part of a series on that part of the world.  When I was looking to visit I found very little written on it.  I’ll add the links as the stories go live.

Road less traveled series…

Traveling Georgetown Guyana Land of Waters

Paramaribo Suriname

Saint Laurent du Maroni French Guiana

 

“Guyana was originally colonized by the Netherlands. Later, it became a British colony, known as British Guiana, and remained so for over 200 years until it achieved independence on 26 May 1966 from the United Kingdom. On 23 February 1970, Guyana officially became a republic. In 2008, the country joined the Union of South American Nations as a founding member.” – More on Wikipedia article on Guyana

Map of Northern South America

 

Georgetown is pretty raw.  It’s a fascinating colonial town, but much of it looks like it hasn’t had much care since 1966.  This isn’t going to be a history lesson more than sharing what I saw and experienced.

 

Welcome to city hall… GeorgeTown

Georgetown City Hall Guyana

 

One of the most fantastic experiences was wandering the city.  I’ve collected 5 things to see in Georgetown and surrounding.

 

 

Guyana Light house and Beach

Guyana Beach

Guyana LighthouseGuyana Lighthouse

 

Colonial House in Georgetown Guyana

Back side of Georgetown City Hall

 

Starbroek Market

1. StarBroek Market… Fresh Meat and Food Market, Ferry Terminal and the heartbeat of the town.  The name of the market is the old name of the city during dutch times. The beautiful architecture is an important part and key attraction of the city.  It is organized chaos.  This country really doesn’t get much tourists and you can tell that by the reactions you’ll get at the market.  They aren’t pushy, they are simply surprised to see you.  The homeless people sleeping near the docs are really sad, but it gives you a temperature on the city.

Starbroek Market Vegtables

The market is raw, and it’s a great way to see life in Georgetown.

Georgetown Ferry

Ferry system in Georgetown to cross the great river

 

2. Capital and Grounds

Republic of GuyanaCapital of Guyana

In the national library we met a guy who wanted to show us something really cool… The real signed documents for independence!

Queen Elizabeth Signature

The actual signatures of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip on the Independence documents

Queen Elizabeth Statue Guyana

Judicial Court including statue of Queen Elizabeth herself

3. Promenade Gardens – a nice walk through the city will lead you to the gardens.  Everything is all pretty close and an easy walk.

Guyana Gardens

Gardens… While we didn’t end up spending so much time here.  I hear there are places where you can see manatees.  Virtualtourist Georgetown page has some more info on that.

 

Guyana Streets

There are some nice walking areas of town where you can get a feel for the bustling of the city while enjoying the people watching and soaking up the atmosphere.

homeless sleeper

A common site in Georgetown and a dose of reality is the sleepers.  Homelessness is a global phenomenon, and I don’t mean to be unfair, but this is the reality of Georgetown.  Lots of them.

sad horse

You can tell by the look of this horse that they’ve had some tough times.

You need to be ok with seeing a lot of poverty to visit this city, but believe me… there is hope.  There is a generation of powerful youth with a bright hope for the future.

Guyana Technology Youth

I had lunch with five bright young people that represent hope.  They are the future of Guyana.

There is a hindu influence that is also felt.  There are really 3 major groups of people that I came across while in Guyana.  The Blacks (former slaves), the Indians (former british labor), and the natives or AmerIndians.  All groups have been exploited and feel marginalized, but it was both my lunch with the technical group shown above that gives me hope and my visit to the Amerindians that also made me excited about the potential.  The teens were dancing to native songs that were designed to carry a positive message of pride in being an Amerindian.   Any travel to a country should and must involve really getting into the culture and trying to understand the people.

4. Local Small Temples and Churches

Guyana Hindu Temple and MosqueGuyana Hindu Temple and Mosque

Small temples and mosques from the Hindustani locals as seen on a short drive through the city.

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4. Amerindian Village – Ask Elvis…

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In the city there are a few reminders about the original inhabitants of Guyana.  They call the native people Amerindians.  They are comfortable with that name as well.

 

Amerindian Elvis

On a drive outside of Georgetown we saw a coconut stand and fresh coconut juice sounded refreshing.  In our conversation with “Elvis” we found an Amerindian village just down a small unmarked dirt road.  Our local friends had no idea the village even existed.  Elvis is the little guy between the two big white guys.  My friend Michael Noel, Sharing the Globe is the one with the massive camera.

Guyana Ameridian Dancing

The kids danced and sang songs of Amerindian bride and culture.  I really enjoyed seeing this. Loved it.

Stickball

Pickup game of stick ball or crickett.  I did try a whack at it, but all I got was laughs.  You gotta love an impromptu gave of cricket with a stick.

Cute little ameridian girl

How can anyone have racial prejudice?  This cute little amerindian little girl melts my heart.

 

5. Black Water Creek Park – an excursion about an hour outside the city is this beautiful palm tree surrounded creek with calm waters is setup as a swimming area with nice little huts.  It’s a beautiful escape, and the water is really funky.  Our local friends took us out here and we had an amazing time wading through the black water.

Kevon in the black water

 

Black water escape

 

Blackwater escape with friends

My hopes and dreams for Guyana are in the youth.  Thanks Kevon for showing us your amazing country!

Meet the Fijian Hindustanis – The Other Side of Fiji


Fiji is a multi racial and multi ethnic place. In my previous post on Fiji I wrote about the native Fijians and my experience connecting with the locals.  The majority of Fijians are native Melanesians.  43% of the population are Indo-Fijians or Hindustanis. Indian indentured laborers were initially brought to Fiji, Indo-Fijian. In the late 1800’s Indians came as indentured laborers to work on the sugar plantations. Most have been here in Fiji for multiple generations.  They even have a fusion language.  After the indentured system ended, many stayed on as farmers and became businessmen.

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Now you have the most amazing fusion.  Hindu temples on an island jungle with culture, language, and society that is culture and tradition rich cultural island nation mixed with the incredible history of India. A little bit of curry goes a long way to spice up a dish.  The colors really light up the place.

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My friend Michael of sharingtheglobe.com is *really* good at travel.  When we put our minds together, we put together incredible adventures.  Michael knew that the hindu holiday of Holi was happening.  So while the first day of our trip, we knew we wanted to venture deep into the island and spend our time in a village.

The adventure began when we woke up on Holi morning.  We knew we wanted to find out where the holi celebration was happening.  We asked around and some mentioned that the Hari Krishna temple was where it was happening.  We tracked it down, and visited it, but while a beautiful building, they weren’t having it there.  They told us to go to a different hindi temple. It was there we saw a small gathering.  It was the super soaker of purple dyes that really made a mess.  We knew as we approached that we were going to get really painted up. 

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Within a couple of minutes, we were soaking with colors of the rainbow.  It was fun, exciting, and we joined in music and food.  The kids were loving it just as much as the adults.

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It was after we left the temple that we we driving a long all painted up when we saw a big truck full of Holi day people.  The truck was like a large military truck with room for tons of people. We waved and they waved back.  They were excited to see follow holi friends and gestured for us to follow them.  We followed them as they drove to a house.  An older lady answered the door, and the music and dancing began and paint started flying.  In western terms it felt like a mix between trick or treating for Halloween, and Christmas caroling, but the colors feel like a mix of easter and a spring water fight.  Amazing.  I hope you can just imagine the joy we were spreading as we were going from house to house, singing and dancing, and letting go of norms.  It was very energizing to let go and connect with these people.  In the end we stopped for a round of Kava.   

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The purple dyes would take over a week to get out, but the feelings lasted even longer.  I gained a huge appreciation for the hindi people in this experience.  The love, the friendship, it was amazing to see the outreach and ability to connect a community.  These traditions should be respected.  When I found out that not 50 miles from where I’m currently living, the hindu temple has an annual gathering and the community gathers to celebrate with the Hindu people.  If you ever get the chance to celebrate holi.  You must.  It will help you gain a huge appreciation for India, Hindus, and the global culture that has brought spice to the world. Happy Holi, and I pray for continued peace on the island of Fiji.  What an amazing place!!!