Petra Jordan Prehistoric Nabataean Caravan-city and Wonder of the World (4 of 7)

Petra Jordan the Treasury

The Treasury at Petra in Jordan

The Treasury in Petra, Jordan

When I left Microsoft in 2008, I was planning a major trip.  It was my first trip to the middle east, I was to speak in Dubai and Istanbul.  I reached out to my technical blog audience at the time and asked the question… Where should I go… Petra, Jerusalem, or the Pyramids?  A Facebook friend of mine from Jordan named Mo, responded… come to Jordan and we’ll take you to Petra and setup a meeting with our user group… and more!  I was crazy excited such a simple question could be answered so well. As well a blogger in Israel offered up a visit to Jerusalem and opportunity to speak at the User group in Tel Aviv.  What a great opportunity to visit the middle east and really see it from a local perspective.

When I laid out my plans originally I would spend a week between Jordan and Israel.  The first plan involved me flying between Amman and Tel Aviv, but my time in Jordan wasn’t enough to spend the time I wanted to at Petra, so I changed my plans to meet my Israeli friend Avi, at the border.

Amman is a fascinating city.  It is a great modern city, but has a great mix of the old as well.  The shops alone you get a mix of modern and ancient.  There are places were you can easily find people doing trades such as selling clothes, handicrafts, but my favorite is the food.  In Amman there is great humus, meats, and breads.  Some say a lot of the food has it’s roots in Lebanese food.  It’s common to start with finger foods and then work to the beef, and lamb.  You can also find great chicken and turkey.  No pork!

Very common to have big platters of food where you can decide what you want.

This post is in a series of 7 posts on the 7 Wonders of the New World

There are remnants of Rome, and old ruins throughout the city as well.  This Roman Amphitheatre dates back to the before the time of Christ and has some amazing acoustics.  I’m pictured here with my friend Mohammed Zayed from Microsoft, who helped setup a lot of my appointments in Amman, he kept me very busy, and personally made sure I was well taken care of and safe.

As well, there are lots of flavored smoke, Houka, hubbly bubbly, smoke shops for just hanging out and chatting.

For tourists I recommend the King’s car collection.  One of the best exotic car collections around. Bugatti’s, Ferraris, Rolls Royce, and more…

Well, after spending a couple of days with the technical community with a little tour here and there, and some great food.  I was ready to go see Petra.  I couldn’t wait!  My Jordanian friends suggested that I would really like to see the Dead Sea after all our meetings to relax… So I took their advice, and we headed for the Dead Sea.  Once we got there I covered myself head to toe… literally in Dead Sea Mud.

Dead Sea Mud
Dead Sea Mud

It was all the rage.  I did get some footage of a family getting all muddied up.

Having Fun with Dead Sea Mud

Being so close to the holy land it was fascinating to imagine that Moses, Jesus, Elijah, and so many of the ancient prophets use to walk these lands. My Muslim friends were so kind as to take me to the River Jordan where Christ was baptized, and the same river where Naaman was told to dip in the River Jordan 7 times in (2nd Kings) to be healed of Leaprosy.  You can see the milky muddy river wouldn’t be that appealing.  This little river is the border… right next to this platform is an armed guard, and right on the other side of those reeds is an Israeli fort with its flag waving.  I’m sure both sides were watching my move.  A catholic priest who was part of our tour group offered to baptize my Muslim friends.  Poor timing?

Waters of the River Jordan

After the Dead Sea, and Jordan River, we headed out toward the desert to go track down Petra.  We wanted to get into Petra the city and spend the night there to see it at first light.  That was a great recommendation… although the route was a bit challenging.  On the road, my friend got a flat tire.  We had a rough time getting the tire off, and while all of us, and the military that happened by couldn’t get it off, a couple of friendly neighborhood chicken farmers figured it out.  This one guy got under the car, and was kicking it so hard I was sure we was going to knock the jack out.  I thought he was going to get crushed.  I tried to stop him, and warn him, but he didn’t understand me.  It was through his efforts we got back on the road with a donut for a tire.

After a number of check stops it didn’t seem like we were getting any closer.  Hours passed, and we started getting to know each other better.  In this chatting, something came up about Palestinians.  What?  After being with these guys for the past few days I thought for sure they were Jordanians.  They were, but their Parents were displaced.  Their parents were refugees from Palestine and had built homes, and families and lives in Jordan.  Wow.  Amazing.  At first I was a little shocked, and scared, but that was simply a media response.  It wasn’t a year earlier I had been watching footage and hearing about what Palestinians teach their children about life.  It was my first experience with Palestinians and since I felt like I knew these guys I really wanted to know what their perspectives were.  It was extremely enlightening to hear how they both knew where their families homes were in Jerusalem.  They both were from the same neighborhood even.  They had different perspectives on the war and the post war effort of how things were dealt with.  I think that’s something that is often overlooked is the literally dozens of collective perspectives of how things are currently being dealt with and how best to end the occupation (as it is explained by most in the West Bank and Gaza), and how to arrive at peace.  While I didn’t have much of an opinion on this, I was eager to understand as much as I could.  I was after peace, and felt like the better educated I was, I could share what I had learned.  A few days later, I’d find out the perspective of my Jewish/Israeli friends, and again in Dubai with even more Jordanian and Palestinian friends, and a year or so later with friends in Egypt, and then even more in a visit to Ramallah.

There is still a lot of animosity.  Most wars end with clear lines and boundaries, and some kind of plan to work toward.  Instead there’s a lot of confusion, and neither side has found an arrangement that works for the other.  It’s a bad situation and the leadership on both sides of the last few decades hasn’t allowed it to work out for either side.  Those in the West Bank have tried very hard to make a better life for their families.  More on that in my blog on Palestine… to be written.

I’ve made a lot of Palestinian friends… My second trip to Jordan I had a whole crew that made a special trip to see me.  I was so touched by their sacrifice, I made a special effort to visit them.  There are some very special people and when you get to know them individually, you start putting stories to faces, and see different perspectives… it’s all eye opening and touching.

Evil Camel in Petra Jordan
Evil Camel in Petra Jordan

After driving into the desert and realizing this wasn’t the best idea with a donut on, we drove back to Amman and found another more direct route and arrived in Petra at around 5am.  We crashed on a couch at the Marriott, which was also the resort we used when we were putting on the mud.  It was great to see Marriott was doing so well. (I collect Marriott points.)  We washed up, and after some breakfast, we got entrance tickets and started down the canyon.  The sun was coming up, and we were alone as we arrived at the Treasury.  WOW!!! It was so amazing.  What an incredible building carved right into the stone, a building cut out of a cliff.

The Monastery at Petra Jordan
The Monastery at Petra Jordan

Petra was as amazing as it looks and as Indiana Jones makes it look.  It’s awesome.  Totally worth the trip.  Wish I could have spent more time exploring.

Walking up through the high walled canyon to Petra… as it is revealed

After seeing the Treasury, I really wanted to see the Monastery, but I knew it was a lot of hiking with steps involved.  I had very little time, since I was going to need to rush off to the border.  I was way behind, and I was fascinated by the Donkey ride idea so I talked my friends, one of them at least into riding Donkeys.  To this day, he won’t ride the donkeys to Petra.  It was a very scary dangerous ride up steps, on cliffs, with a saddle that looks like it could choke the poor little donkey.

Jordan Travel Tips:

1. You MUST see the Treasury.  That one is required.  The second best is the Monastery.  Once you arrive at the Monastery you should go and look at it from various points of view.  There are some great places to view it on the hills.

2. Early is best.  6am is the preferred time.  Ideally you want the experience of walking through the canyons and it seems dark because of the canyon walls, and as you walk out the sun is shining brightly on the Treasury.  Early light is best.  The crowds will come as the tour buses arrive and people start coming in on carriages and the routes fill up fast.  We didn’t see anyone when we first headed out, but on our way back the Treasury was packed with people and they had a hard time getting pictures without people in their pictures.

3. The Dead sea is worth it.  The MUD is amazing!  You should definitely try it.  The Sea doesn’t stink.  It is very relaxing and yes, you can float!  Very cool feeling.  Keep the water out of your ears and out of your eyes.  It burns like crazy.

4. The Jordan River did feel more authentic in the Jordanian natural setting than the one on the Israeli side.  In Israel they have a place where people line up to do baptisms, and groups gather to collect vials of water, and have spiritual experiences.  The Jordan side was not crowded.  There was an orthodox church, and you can ride in the back of a truck to see the ancient steps that show ancient proof that this could be where Jesus was baptized by John the Baptist.

While this footage doesn’t look that bad.  You can tell by my expressions that the cliffs and the steps are crazy on the back of a little donkey.

Insane Donkey Ride in Petra

If you’ve got the time, you don’t need to ride the Donkeys.  There were also camels… but it wasn’t my day for camels.  After my amazing tour of Petra, I flew in a taxi to the King Husain Bridge crossing where I’d find that I was crossing not directly into Israel, but into the West Bank…

Read more about my adventures in the Palestinian Territories & West Bank…

Doha Qatar: Pearl of the Persian Gulf

Doha Qatar - Pearl of Persian Gulf - Corniche

Pearl monument - Corniche - Doha

It was on a trip to Dubai where I was planning a trip to Tehran, and I found an  8 hour layover in Qatar.  I had heard very little of this little Pearl in the Persian Gulf.  Qatar Airways had all sorts of cool destinations and for a decent price I was able to fly spend a decent amount of time enough to get out and see the city.  It was with a Jordanian Facebook friend’s, friend I met Mohammed Afana.  I learned a few years ago to embrace the friends of friends and unless there are signs otherwise to connect with people in ways that otherwise would not be possible in such a short period of time.  I had 8 hours or less with Mohammed, and we really became close.  I have had a hard time expressing the connections I’ve made with the Palestinian people.  On my technical blog I’ve shared a little, and it appears it’s been misunderstood.  Below Muslim Education Center fashioned after a thousand year old Mosque in Iraq.

I do feel for the Palestinian people, and my experiences with Mohammed Afana are no different than others I have met.  He was extremely kind, open, caring, and was a brother to me while I was with him.  His parents are refugees from Palestinian Territories, and he was born in Qatar.  We learn from people and walking in someone else’s shoes. 

Mhmd’s a Judo expert.  He’s very skilled.  He actually competed at the world class level on the national team for years.  He picked me up at the airport, ready to show me a night on the town.  It was awesome.  

We started out by going to Souk Waqif a traditional bizarre and market.  This isn’t the high end shopping, but has awesome shops that will much better help you connect with the locals.  I ran into this sheik boy with his pet falcon! 

By the way, this Souk is only 10-15 minutes from the airport and truly is an old market that was built originally by Beduins from the desert to sell their wells.  There are some great prices, and cool stuff you’ve never seen before.

This cool sundial? reminds me of the Dark Chrystal.

pet falcon doha qatar

The white clothes he’s wearing are actually very comfortable.  I had the chance to wear one while in UAE.  They are very light and cool.  It’s very understandable how modest, clean, and all together cool in how they keep the sun off your skin, as well as provide a covering.  A friend of mine in Bahrain who wears both jeans and the white robe, prefers the traditional garb because it’s much cooler.  As well the hatta or hat scarf on the head is great for keeping the sun off your head and neck.  When I’m in the middle east I often prefer that as well as it is great for doing just that.  It’s much cooler and keeps me from getting burned. While at the market I came across these cool traditional knives.

I was considering getting one of them based on the reasonable prices, until I remembered I didn’t want to check anything at the airport… especially some kind of weapon on my flight to Iran.  I loved that shop.  They had such cool travel items. 

This traditional Muslim headdress and mask totally reminded me of my recent trip to Oman.  The face guard almost looks metallic.  When I first saw one on a lady I had to do a doubletake and had to slow down to take a picture… likely the opposite reaction that the lady was looking for.  I would say in my time in the middle east I did gain a great respect for the women’s clothing.  The flowing robes became very attractive and the mysterious eyes.  Some of those eyes were just so incredible!  Again, I know it’s the opposite of what they are going after… I guess. 

I ended up bringing back some traditional Muslim robes for my wife.  Which I’m sure she appreciated.  I also brought back what I call the Emirate robes.  We make quite the couple.  We look just like the couple above.  Some days in the summer I will put on my robes for around the house.  I’ve got a much thinker one I got in Morocco that I wear in the winter.  Sometimes I feel like I look like a monk in my big thick brown robes, another ironic moment.

Doha is from the future.  You’ve heard about how these amazing tall buildings and structures have gone up in Dubai, UAE.  What you may have missed is that Doha is really where it’s at.  Doha got it’s wind right after Dubai and has had some fantastic architecture put up.  The night sky is filled with crazy lights on fascinating shaped buildings.  It reminds me of a lazer light show on the buildings.  It’s far from boxy.  You get pin cushion looking buildings, and buildings that look more like puzzles, and cones, and twisty looking towers.  Awesome.

 

You also may have heard about the Palms in Dubai.  This place where reclaimed land from the sea was pushed into the shape of Palm leaves?  Well in Doha Qatar it’s the Pearl.  You get this amazing island in the shape of a clam with a pearl in the center.  The shopping rivals any 5th avenue, or High Streets of Europe.  Looking around the photo, you can see the humus and oil  as well as lamb shanks.

For lunch we stopped at an Iraqi resteraunt.  I hadn’t had Iraqi food before and it sounded fascinating.  The food was great.  I had mixed grills, lamb, beef, chicken, tomato, onion… looks great doesn’t it!  Awesome fresh grilled fresh food!

After dinner we got out on the water in some traditional Persian boats that almost looked Chinese.  The Corniche is a great relaxing place to walk.  Lots of locals walking along the shore.  As well, we saw some high end shops… and ultimately ended the late night with some Turkish Schwarma, the place was packed! Yum… some of the best schwarma I’ve ever had.

Qatar did not dissapoint.  It was a great stopover.  I would go back in a heart beat.  Great people, amazing experiences, great food, beautiful water experiences.  It’s amazing how they’ve made this desert Oasis bloom.

Leaving a friend behind who I had just met was with mixed emotion.  I wanted to stay, but was looking forward to my trip ahead… Iran.