North Korea the Forbidden Zone. Can You Really Travel to DPRK?


It wasn’t until I was in Chernobyl that I met my first traveler that had visited North Korea.  I’d later meet a traveler in Mongolia.  It always felt impossible until this older lady said she it was amazing adventure.  I’m a time traveler, so I get a kick out of visiting the 60s.  There are really very few places that allow one to go back in time and DPRK is definitely in that category.

Update: Travel is now blocked for the majority of US Citizens.  I visited a couple of years ago when it was just thought impossible.  Now it’s a lot harder for Americans.

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More details on the Chinese Consulate website.  If you’re looking for a special passport that would allow you to travel to North Korea you can get one here on the

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Travel Restriction

As of September 1, 2017, U.S. passports will not be valid for travel to, in, or through North Korea (also known as Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, or DPRK).

The U.S. Department of State may grant an exception to qualified applicants by issuing a passport with a special validation that will be valid for only one trip.  These specific, one-time-use validations will be issued on an extremely limited basis.

Travel to, in, or through North Korea on a U.S. passport without this special validation may justify revocation of your passport for misuse under 22 C.F.R. § 51.62(a)(2) and may subject you to felony prosecution under 18 U.S.C. § 1544 or other applicable laws.

Who Can Get a Special Validation Passport?

We will only issue a Special Validation Passport if your trip is in the national interest, and you meet all regular passport requirements.

Your trip might be in the national interest if any of the following are true:

  • You are a professional reporter or journalist and the purpose of your trip is to collect, and make available to the public, information about the DPRK.

 

  • You are a representative of the International Committee of the Red Cross or the American Red Cross traveling on an officially-sponsored Red Cross mission to the DPRK.
  • Your trip to the DPRK is justified by compelling humanitarian considerations.
  • Your trip to the DPRK is otherwise in the national interest.
  • More information on the US State Department website on Travel to North Korea.

     

    All of this being said, let me tell you a little about my trip to the isolated country.

    I won’t use this post to talk about the politics… Anyone who ever decides to go to a place that has a required guide and package encourages one to follow the rules.  Iran, Turkmenistan, and DPRK are all good examples of places where you should follow the rules to the “T”.  It would be insane to cross any of these regimes as a traveler within their borders.

     

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    Mansu Hill Grand Monument

    The central part of the monument consists of two 20-meter (66-foot) tall bronze statues of Supreme North Korean leaders Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-il.

    In North Korea, the following – whether done knowingly or unknowingly – have been treated as crimes:

    • Showing disrespect to the country’s former leaders, Kim Il Sung or Kim Jong Il, or the country’s current leader, Kim Jong Un, including but not limited to tampering with or mishandling materials bearing their names or images;

     

  • Entering North Korea without proper travel documentation;
  • Possessing material that is in any way critical of the DPRK government;
  • Proselytizing or carrying out religious activities, including activities that may be construed as such, like leaving behind religious materials;
  • Engaging in unsanctioned political activities;
  • Traveling without authorization, even for short distances;
  • Having unauthorized interaction with the local population;
  • Exchanging currency with an unauthorized vendor;
  • Taking unauthorized photographs;
  • Bringing pornography into the country;
  • Shopping at stores not designated for foreigners; and
  • Removing or tampering with political slogans and signs or pictures of political leaders.
  • Our guides explained to us if we couldn’t do the

     

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    September 9 Mass Dance

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    Pyongyang, DPRK

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    The old Korean Ladies at the Park who love to dance and sing

    Pyongyang city of contrast

    Pyongyang a city of contrast – Where else in the world can you rise to political marching music

     

    Pyongyang Train

    Ride the train.  Are we riding the train that rides to nowhere with passengers that are riding it because that’s what they were assigned to do?

     

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    History

    Mansudae Fountain Park

    Spectacular fountains reaching for grandeur

    Mansudae Fountain Park The park’s centerpiece, 28 angelic-looking white statues of women performing a dance called the “Snow Falls.”

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    There are more statues in Pyongyang…

    North Korean Happy Kids

    Sad, happy, the kids are the future.

    Pyongyang Times

    The Times… The Pyongyang Times

     

     

    A Chollima is a mythical winged horse

    A Chollima is a mythical winged horse that originates from the Chinese classics and is commonly portrayed in East Asian cultures. This winged horse is said to be too swift and elegant to be mounted (by any mortal man)

     

    Traffic Police North Korea

    My favorite thing about the very light traffic of Pyongyang was the old school but lovely super cool traffic police

     

    Pyongyang Beerfest

    Pyongyang Beerfest performances

     

    Pyongyang Mass Dance

    Mass Dance under the watch of the Dear Leaders

     

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    It was on this ride in Pyongyang that I had a moment.  I held the hand of a DPRK citizen for about 2 minutes.  It was as if to reach out in a silent way and attempt to connect with my soul.  It worked.  I really feel for the people.  I pray for the people of North Korea I wish them the best, I hope for them God given freedoms of faith, expression, and thought.

    As Kim Jong Un meets with the Chinese President and the American President may they all consider the future of the people of all nations.  There are good innocent people that deserve our love.

    I’m very hopeful for peaceful resolution.  I welcome a denuclearized Korean peninsula.  I visited Guam last Winter after the escalations.  It’s no fun to travel with the idea that something may happen and everyone is on their toes.

    I still can’t believe I was in my hotel room in Pyongyang when I found out a Nuke had been tested in North Korea and the TV in the hotel told me while I was there shared news through the only news channel in the hotel… Al Jazeera TV.  Quickly our situation escalated.  What if we couldn’t get home?  The next morning we were bumped from our flight.  The first plane leaving the country was overbooked and we joined a number of locals headed to China for education on the next flight.  That easily was one of the highest risk nights of my life….

     

    Kim Statues

     

    DPRK Beerfest
    Here’s to peace and a denuclearized Korean Peninsula!  Anyone in the world considering a trip should consider the risks and make sure you have no ulterior motives.

 

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